Halloween Facts

Halloween Facts

Halloween is a holiday celebrated each year on October 31 of every year. The tradition originated with the ancient Celtic festival of Samhain, when people would light bonfires and wear costumes to ward off ghosts.  The evening before was known as All Hallows Eve, and later Halloween.

For every fun loving person all over the world, Halloween is a day of fun and celebration all manner of of costumes that could be considered monster costumes. These costumes range from masks to complete body wear, many people imitating their favorite movie super heroes or monsters and others imitating their favorite super heroes from their favorite novels. Irrespective of what your costume will be on this year’s Halloween, one thing is sure we’re all going to have fun, before that you need to know some facts about Halloween, these facts will prepare you with knowledge about Halloween. As the culture of this site is all about sharing facts that are very interesting and mind blowing, be rest assured these unknown Halloween facts will blow your mind leaving you asking for more facts to satisfy your curiosity.

Anyway, let’s dive straight into the list of facts about Halloween nit everyone knows about.

 

#1. Halloween is the second highest grossing commercial holiday after Christmas.

Halloween Facts

#2. The fear of Halloween is Samhainophobia.

Halloween Facts

#3. The Guinness World Record for Heaviest Pumpkin is held by Mathias Willemijns from Belgium.

Halloween Facts

#4. Treating started from the ancient Celtic tradition of putting out treats and food to placate spirits who roamed the streets at Samhain.

Halloween Facts

#5. “Souling” is a medieval Christian precursor to modern-day trick-or-treating.

Halloween Facts

Interesting history facts.

#6. The first known mention of trick-or-treating in print in North America occurred in 1927 in Blackie, Canada.

Halloween Facts

 

#7. November 1, the poor usually would go door-to-door offering prayers for the dead in exchange for soul cakes.

Halloween Facts

#8. Fifty percent of kids prefer to receive chocolate candy for Halloween.

Halloween Facts

#9. The owl is a popular Halloween image. In Medieval Europe, owls were thought to be witches, and to hear an owl’s call meant someone was about to die.

Halloween Facts

See these Halloween trivia questions and answers.

#10. Halloween is also called All Hallows’ Eve, Witches Night, Lamswool, Snap-Apple Night, Samhaim, and Summer’s End.

Halloween Facts

#11. Ireland is the birthplace of Halloween.

Halloween Facts

#12. Scarecrows, a popular Halloween fixture, symbolize the ancient agricultural roots of the holiday.

Halloween Facts

#13. If one wears his or her clothes inside out and then walks backwards on Halloween, he or she will see a witch at midnight.

Halloween Facts

#14. In Bellville, Missouri, it is illegal to ask for candy if you are over the age of 13.

Halloween Facts

#15. Harry Houdini the famous magician died on October 31, 1926.

Halloween Facts

#16. The method of dressing up as ghouls and other spooks originated from the ancient Celtic tradition of townspeople disguising themselves as demons and spirits.

Halloween Facts

#17. The National Retail Federation expects consumers in 2010 to spend $66.28 per person on Halloween costumes.

Halloween Facts

#18. In 1970, a five-year-old boy Kevin Toston allegedly ate Halloween candy laced with heroin.

Halloween Facts

#19. In 1974, eight-year-old Timothy O’Bryan died of cyanide poisoning after eating Halloween candy.

Halloween Facts

#20. The longest haunted house in the world is “Factory of Terror” in Canton, Ohio.

Halloween Facts

#21. Halloween is thought to have originated around 4000 B.C., which means Halloween has been around for over 6,000 years.

Halloween Facts

#22. It is believed that a child born on Halloween is said to have the ability to talk to spirits.

Halloween Facts

#23. Teng Chieh or the Lantern Festival is one Halloween festival in China.Halloween Facts

#24. In many countries, such as France and Australia, Halloween is seen as an unwanted and overly commercial American influence.

Halloween Facts

#25. Both Salem, Massachusetts, and Anoka, Minnesota, are the self-proclaimed Halloween capitals of the world.

Halloween Facts

#26. research shows that children are more than twice as likely to be killed in a pedestrian/car accident on Halloween than on any other night.

Halloween Facts

#27. Boston, Massachusetts, holds the record for the most Jack O’Lanterns lit at once (30,128).

Halloween Facts

#28. Pumpkins are classified as a fruit, not as a vegetable.

Halloween Facts

#29. Count Wampyr was the original name of Count Dracula in Bram Stoker’s famous book.

Halloween Facts

#30. The blockbuster movie Halloween was filmed in just 21 days.

Halloween Facts

#31. The movie Halloween was originally titled Babysitter Murders.

Halloween Facts

#32. The stabbing sounds in the Halloween movie is made by a knife being plunged into a watermelon.

Halloween Facts

#33. California banned masks without a permit in the an attempt to decrease robberies and crime on Halloween.

Halloween Facts

#34. Mexico celebrates the Days of the Dead (Días de los Muertos) on the Christian holidays All Saints’ Day (November 1)

Halloween Facts

#35. The estimated calories of candy bag each child collects contains an average of 11,000 calories.

Halloween Facts

Do you know about Hoodie-hoo day?

FAQ

  • Why is Halloween celebrated?

Halloween is celebrated as an act to ward off as much evil as possible, while this claim is not held by everyone, it is by a lot of people who linked Halloween’s day celebration to the ancient celebration which aimed at warding off spirits of the dead that come to harm people and crops. The tradition associated with these included appeasing such spirits so they don’t come back.

  • How Did Halloween start?

Halloween started a long time ago as Festival of Samhain that dates back to ancient Celtic religion in Europe. It was usually held at the end of summer. In summary, it was all about scaring away the spirits of the dead by dressing like monsters and dead people and also performing some rituals.

  • Who invented Halloween?

Halloween was invented by the Celts who lived over 2,000 years ago in pre-Christian Europe, it was a festival celebrated by the Celts during those times. The same festival was brought to North America in the 19th century as Halloween festival.

  • When did Halloween start in America?

Halloween started in America in the 1900s, it was brought here by immigrants from Europe, particularly from Scotland and Ireland.

  • Why do we carve pumpkins?

We carve human faces pumpkins as a symbol representing Halloween, this tradition of carving pumpkins into human faces dates back to the ancient Celtic festival of Samhain, aimed at warding off the spirits of the dead. This same tradition is the origin of Halloween.

  • How old is Halloween?

Halloween is 2,000 years old, at least according to scholars who have traced the origin of Halloween to the ancient Celts in Europe. From these, it is believed the Halloween festival is over 2,000 years old.

  • What is the real reason for Halloween?

The reason for Halloween is to ward off the spirits of the dead, and make them not hard humans and crops. This is the reason for Halloween if we’re to link it to it’s origin and roots.

  • What is the real meaning of Halloween?

The reason for Halloween is to ward off the spirits of the dead, and make them not hard humans and crops. This is the reason for Halloween if we’re to link it to it’s origin and roots. Though the name ‘Halloween’ comes from All Hallows’ Eve , it is just the modern name, but the traditions remain almost the same as the Samhain festival from ancient Celts.

  • What started Halloween?

The ancient Celts started Halloween. Halloween started in America in the 1900s, it was brought here by immigrants from Europe, particularly from Scotland and Ireland.

  • How did Halloween start and why?

Halloween was started by the Celts who lived over 2,000 years ago in pre-Christian Europe, it was a festival celebrated by the Celts during those times. The same festival was brought to North America in the 19th century as Halloween festival.